14 comments on “In Springs New Things – The New Generation of Birds

  1. Oh I do love those little fairy wrens and woodducks! Your words of the importance of a father figure cannot be overstated…and to be honest, it is one of my biggest concerns as I watch the society around me.

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    • Thanks Jen, yes it is a real concern in both our countries, especially with the problem of the absent and self obsessed fathers of our day. The biggest problem is sadly many were poorly fathered themselves. I am thankful for God’s grace in that I was able to realize my need to not copy my dad’s mistakes while my children were still very young. Enjoy your beautiful colorful fall vistas and blessings to your family!

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  2. You always have a beautiful variety of birds! The Sacred Kingfisher is a good looking bird that I wish to be able to photograph one day. Thank you for the excellent post, Ashley. 🙂

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  3. Great post, AB! I always love seeing me variety of birds you share. Funny… My kids are on a vacation in New Zealand and Australia, and I’m seeing a number of their bird sightings on your blog☺️
    The sacred Kingfisher has similar coloring to the malachite kingfisher someone recently showed me photos of from Africa.

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  4. This is a wonderful treatise of parental responsibility and raising of young in the avian world, with appropriate lessons for us as well. Love your “foreign” birds from down under, especially the well named Sacred Kingfisher and Fairy-wren. Great post.

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    • Thanks BrighamStephen, for your most encouraging comment. So glad you enjoy our birds,and yes we learn so many life lessons from them as my book illustrates. Enjoy your weekend! 🙂

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  5. Thanks David, yes the Kingfishers do not like being watched. It took a bit of fast movement to follow their movements, and the worm seemed to come out of nowhere, it was so quick. The Red-caps I posted recently are in the same danger as your, dog owners don’t obey signs. Not only do they bring their dogs into a non dog area but they let them off the lead to run, and they are biiig dogs!
    It is amazing these little guys survive, but they seem to. Interesting about the Shelducks, maybe that’s why I seem to see them only on their own. Have a great weekend!

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  6. Hi Ashley, when the Kingfishers turn up, we really do consider it Spring. The local first nation people used to think the arrival and departure of the Sacred was a special occassion.

    Great series on the bird, we’ve yet to really find a co-operative one. 🙂

    Had a few days at a beach side the past couple of days, signs and marked off areas on the beach for nesting Red-capped Plovers. Dog owners seemed oblivious to the signs and the dogs ran uncontrolled through the areas. Didn’t see any losses, but the poor old plovers were in a bit of a tizz. Sad.

    Woodies seem to just accumulate young don’t they. Someone once told me that if two pairs were on the same pond that the stronger female would kidnap all the young to look after. Given the sizes of some clutches we see, it might have a bit of truth somewhere.
    Although I’ve also been told that Shelducks will kill any young that are not theirs on their pond.

    Hope the season goes well for your birds.
    DJ

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    • Thanks David, yes the Kingfishers do not like being watched. It took a bit of fast movement to follow their movements, and the worm seemed to come out of nowhere, it was so quick. The Red-caps I posted recently are in the same danger as your, dog owners don’t obey signs. Not only do they bring their dogs into a non dog area but they let them off the lead to run, and they are biiig dogs!
      It is amazing these little guys survive, but they seem to. Interesting about the Shelducks, maybe that’s why I seem to see them only on their own. Have a great weekend!

      Like

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