14 comments on “5 Steps to Better Birding – Oatley Park Reserve

  1. It is somewhat ironic that listening is step one when you bird *watch. It is true though. You first listen…, then you follow your ears until you reach the “look” step.

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    • Thanks Mario, yes this is the way we best find birds, and our hearing, identifying and locating abilities continue to improve the more we employ our birding skills. We become so in tune with the sounds of the birds. Sometimes it is not their song that attracts but the sound of bark, twigs or pine cones falling, the sounds of scratching and leaf movement on the forest floor. The more we stand still and listen the more we discover. Thanks so much for sharing and have a wonderful weekend!

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  2. Beautiful birds and great advice, my friend! I am reasonably okay on four of the steps, with the exception of step 4 🙂 I guess that makes me ‘only’ a bird watcher and not a birder. Finding new species of birds is wonderful, but not important to me. I enjoy seeing the same birds over and over again and learning to know them and their personalities – like the residents at the salt marsh 🙂 I also feel that if I don’t get a ‘shot’ of the bird, I have not really seen it.

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    • Thanks Tiny, It is good that you enjoy seeing your local birds in the salt marsh, as I do my birds that visit my home each day. I love hearing their excited call and watching them drink and bath in our bird baths. I personally am not into lists as others are and like you use my camera as my main way to logue my birds, I then place them in folders in my speciated bird album. I love the additional delight you derive from your birding experience in that you have caricatured your resident birds, and how this adds a creative flavour to your presentations in your posts which we the readers all enjoy. Have a wonderful weekend my friend 🙂

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    • Thanks Brigham, Yes it is good to have a way of remembering the order of things. A friend suggested a children’s book for young birders using the 5 Ls which is interesting me, and may put my second book on hold, as one of my goals is to encourage young people to get outside and enjoy the Creation around them. Thanks again for your most welcome comment.

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  3. Some great tips here Ashley. I usually find that if I am quiet and still and patient, birds start to carry on their business as usual and can come up quite close to you which is a real treat!

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    • Thanks Sue, yes that is the best way, and doing this builds trust in them as well, as recent research shows, they remember us quite well as to who are friends and risks. Have a great long weekend!

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  4. Hi AB, absolutely the best tip. Wait and they will come to you. Its often amazing how many you can see after a 20 minute sit in a quiet spot.
    I was sitting on a park bench the other day with a colony of Blue Wrens feeding around my feet. Can’t get much better.

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    • Thanks David, yes the old school bird watchers sit wait and ponder, the new young breed tend to rush through the forest, and see very little. There is a lot of wisdom in stilling oneself on a shady seat and enjoying the moment and its solitude. Wrens around one’s feet, so true, it just can’t get much better 🙂

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