9 comments on “After the Deluge – Where Are The Birds?

  1. I feel so sorry for the birds who stayed and were killed or injured by the super storm. This is very similar to what I observed after Hurricane Sandy came through here last year in September. Much fewer birds at the marsh for a long time…and even the osprey couple were gone for many weeks. I hope many of your birds fled instinctively and were spared from injuries.

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    • Thanks Tiny, Since then we have had several other super storms, as our weather has been most unusual for this time of year dumping rain and hail in unexpected locations and volumes. I fear many birds will not have young this year. The weather is so erratic lately we do not know what we are going to get from day to day. I am having a break from birding for the next few weeks as it has become so humid and stormy. Looking for forward to a break from work and Christmas celebration. Praying God’s richest blessings on you and your family for this Christmas time, especially as like myself, you enjoy watching your grandies enjoy this season and all the enjoyment it brings. Peace and joy to youmy friend!

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  2. Hi Ashley, I enjoyed your post, I especially liked the photos of the colourful native flowers. In regards to the crimson rosella you saw, I have actually seen back in Queensland a pale headed rosella do that same tail shake while sitting on a tree branch making sounds. It must be a quirk of the rosella family. 🙂

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    • Thanks Sue, that Rosella shaking of the tail I just read is part of a courtship behaviour which they can continue to do even when they are not actively courting. Thanks for sharing or I would never had researched it. They also shake themselves and ruffle their feathers during courtship. I remember their were two rosellas when I took my movie clip and this one was following the other which was feeding on Bottlebrush nearby. Have a wonderful Christmas and New Year Sue. Your first Tassie Christmas. I remember one year watching the end of the Sydney to Hobart race from a rental at Sandy Bay in Hobart many years ago. I spent Christmas in bed sunburnt due to the hole in the ozone layer which is a problem living in Tassie. I took too long landing a fish with no sun protection. The good thing is the very long twilight in summer and opportunity to see the Southern Lights (Aurora Australis) in winter which I would love to see.

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      • Thanks Ashley, however I will actually be spending Christmas on the Gold Coast this year with family and catching up with old work friends. And I hear you about the sun down here in Tassie. I’ve been very careful about using sunscreen as the UV is very high most days now. And it actually feels so much hotter here when it’s only 26, as it feels like well over 30, so I am continually surprised by the unusual heat here. Now I understand why Tasmanians complain about the heat in summer even though they don’t often get the high temperatures like on the mainland. The sun is setting just before 9pm now and that still feels strange to me, but does give plenty of time after work to go for a walk and do other things outside. Enjoy the rest of the week and Happy Christmas to you and your family! 🙂

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  3. Thank you for sharing an update after the severe storm, Ashley. To sit as you did and not hear all the birds must have felt a bit heart-wrenching. It is nice to see the blooms look lovely and inviting. Hopefully, those that were able to leave before the storm will return to find the bevy of food awaiting them.

    Wonderful photos of those that are still thriving the area as well! I was most intrigued with your Green Catbird and Satin Bowerbird captures, both are very stunning birds.

    Great message on life’s storms, Ashley. We all have them, it’s how we handle them. 🙂 I hope you have a wonderful week as well, my friend!

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    • Thanks Donna, Australia is known as the land of droughts and flooding rain, we get one or the other. We have moved back to drought again and everything is dry again. The birds are not breeding in great numbers this year again, and of those that have, many have been injured or abandoned nest due to storm. It was surprising to find such shy rainforest birds out in the open in the gardens. Have a wonderful week!

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  4. Hello AB,
    It is a most interesting season, we’ve been finding. Our local wagtails would normally be on their second clutch by now, but are still working on the first. No real reason.
    We normally get large numbers of Dusky Woodswallows in one park we regularly visit, but this year the numbers are quite small, although they have been successful.
    Well done seeing and photographing the Bassian Thrush, not one I have ever been successful with.
    Thanks for your tireless work through the year and may the upcoming festive season be a delight and joy for you and yours.
    DJ

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    • Thanks David, and thanks for your support and encouraging comments through the year, I have enjoyed your posts and what you have shared. We are planning a road trip to Victoria in the new year hoping to see some of your birds and visit Werribee on the way. Yes the Bassian is an elusive creature usually seen in the dark of the rainforest making t difficult to get a good pic. The good thing is that they freeze when spotted as part of their survival technique blending in with the surrounding environment, thinking you can not see them. I do have good pics of them in the daylight but many blurred and dark ones taken in the deep dark forest. May you and your family also have a wonderful festive season and enjoy the holiday.

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