18 comments on “Crazy Cone Crunchers – The Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo

  1. Lovely pictures and video, Ashley! Thank you! I didn’t know the birds in the Parrot Family are also married for life, just like the Ospreys. That’s just wonderful.

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    • Thanks Tiny, yes I used the Rainbow Lorikeet as an example in my book, but most of the parrot, cockatoo family mate for life except one naughty species, the Eclecsis Parrot (sorry spelling may be wrong) this bird is quite the opposite. Have a great Week, winter has arrived here, and thankfully it is raining😊

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  2. Fascinating and beautiful, I love that gorgeous tail! Wonderful captures and I enjoyed the video too. A great post in teaching as well, we could definitely learn to be better by watching the love and care birds and wildlife give each other. Have a wonderful week, Ashley!

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    • Thanks Donna,
      It is always thrill to see these birds in action. Yes we can learn so much from birds, and always makes a good springboard for teaching and counseling. Enjoy your week 😊

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  3. Some lovely images of a magnificent bird Ashley, and I loved watching your video. To see so many of them at once would have been amazing. Thanks for the link! 🙂

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    • Thanks Sue, yes it is a birders feast to be among thirty to fifty birds along with a similar number of Little Corella and Sulfurs. W e don’t get Pied Butcherbirds this far south on the coast, and I miss their call I use to love when I was on the property on north coast. It was a delight to hear what you found and share it. We have clever birds here in Oz. Enjoy your weekend!

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    • Thanks HJ, yes Australia has a large variety of parrot and related species such as Cockatoo, which is the largest of our seed eating birds and the most spectacular, these include the Sulfur-crested, Yellow-tailed Black, Red-tailed Black, Glossy, Carnabys White-tailed Black, Gang Gang and Palm being but a few of our beautiful ‘cockies’. These birds can learn to mimic our words and speak sentences. They are often in large flocks which follow trees that provide seed for them in native and introduced pine cones and other seed pods, even grass seeds. Have a great weekend!

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    • Thanks Kelly, I always get excited seeing these birds, and they are so noisy eating or making their call, as there are usually a flock with youngsters. They can break open the toughest cone with their beak, in fact, a friend I worked with had her back veranda destroyed by a flock of Sulfur-crested Cockatoo as they chewed the timber to pieces. They are known to destroy trees, and I have seen them doing it, and the final tree fall as they cut through it. They can cut a hole in a tree to make a nesting hole spending days of strenuous work chipping away. Have a great weekend!

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    • Thanks so much Karen, I am so encouraged that you enjoy my post. I love the encouraging material you share in your posts also. As a counselor like yourself (though I am qualified in family counselling I am a scientist by profession but soon semi-retiring to work further with my book, seeking to reach young people before it is too late, this being my main goal, other than helping people through bad and broken relationships) seeking to make a difference and leave a legacy to as many people we encourage and help. Richest Blessings my friend, and have a restful weekend.

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