20 comments on “Showcasing Australia’s Most Popular Birds

  1. Love the photo of the magpie with chicks in the nest, what a great capture! Magpies seem to be those birds that people either love or hate, and they usually don’t like them if they’ve been swooped by them. As for me, I love my magpie family, they are great to have around, especially when calling an alarm when there is an unwelcome visitor. Have a great weekend!

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    • Thanks Sue, yes that nest shot was a gem I got when some maggies nested in the back yard of a place I was staying. The funny thing was the owner of the house would get viciously attacked every time they walked out of the house and the maggies never ever attacked me. I could stand next to her and they would attack her even when she had hat and broom in hand. They seem to know I was their friend and not a threat to them. Apparently if they see you as friend you will always be their friend or threat, which ever the case be. It is great having a watch-bird rather than a watch-dog, they are cheaper to feed and less to care for. Enjoy your weekend and stay cool!

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  2. Wonderful showcasing, Ashley, so many gorgeous photos! Three of my Australian favorites make the list, the Kookaburras, Rainbow Lorikeets, and the Superb Fairy-wrens. There was a time I didn’t know anything about those three or many others until I came upon your blog, which I am so thankful! Have a wonderful weekend, hope it’s cooled down some! 🙂

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    • Thanks so much Donna for your encouraging comment. I also owe it to you for introducing me to so many of your wonderful birds. As I write this post I can hear my resident Magpie warbling in my backyard, before it washes in our birdbath, as today will be very hot. Your favorite selection I think is the same for many people both Australian and abroad. This selection is a good cross section of bird types, habitat and food types, though interestingly enough water birds, shorebirds and waders do not get into the picture at all, as they are seldom seen by most. I would of thought at least the Silver Gull ( our sea gull) would have got a place but no. Have a restful weekend Donna!

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    • Thanks Jen, yes we love our birds. For me the wonderful aspect about many of our birds is that they have many varied songs and calls for various occasions. and not just one monotonous song, though there are many who do that also. So their song never gets boring. Have a great weekend!

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  3. This is a great gallery Ashley. I see why they are popular… they are beautiful! My favorites are the Willy Wagtail and the Superb Fairy-wren! 🙂

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    • Thanks HJ, Yes both those birds are active little insectivorous wonders, Willy can be tricky with its lovely song, which can sometimes be mistaken for other birds. Both these birds are usually heard before seen, especially the fairy-wren which jumps about under bushes and can be difficult to see or photograph at times. Enjoy your weekend!

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  4. Fantastic post. Thanks for introducing us to some of Australia’s most popular birds. We can see why they are so enjoyable to watch. Great photos also.

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    • Thanks Lee, we love our birds as you do yours, they bring life and music to our surrounds, which is always a delight. Their songs and chatter is like continual praise and thanksgiving, reminding us of what a Wonderful Living God we have.

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  5. You have featured these birds so nicely in your posts over time! My top four favorites are the Laughing Kookaburra, the Fairy-wren, the Tawny Frogmouth and the Rainbow Lorikeet! Perhaps because we don’t have anything similar here 🙂 Great post! Have a wonderful weekend my friend.

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    • Thanks Tiny,Yes I would agree with you those four are probably more popular than the survey shows, as no one wants to be attacked by Magpies, and many bicycle riders do. I had occasions of being terrified by magpie attacks, coming home crying as a seven year old with bleeding scalp. Funny enough they seem to treat me as friend and attack others with me now.

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      • I see what you mean about Magpies. We have some very aggressive Blackbirds nesting in the palm trees right in our driveway every spring. When I walk out to the street for a walk with Dylan, they tend to attack. I have developed a few good “defenses” because telling them I am a friend has not worked so far 🙂

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  6. Love this post! So many fun birds…of course that fairy wren wouild be my #1! I’m guessing all the photos are yours? Beautiful!
    And a wonderful message to us. I totally agree with your thoughts and how the messages in the bible continue to be valid and true today.

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    • Thanks Kelly, yes I know your fav is the Fairy-wren, as it is with many Australians. One of the questions I get asked when I meet birders from overseas in our national parks is where can I see a fairy-wren. They get quite surprised when I show them how easy they are to find, and how because they are territorial can be found fairly accurately in the same location each day. One usually hears their high pitched chatter before they are seen, as they hide well beneath the bushes. Yes, all the material on my website is my own, including music unless otherwise acknowledged. Thanks for asking this, it has prompted me to add the copyright message after each post.

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  7. Love these birds! I’ve actually blogged about a few of them myself. I wish I had taken better magpie photos when i lived in Sydney (I wasn’t a blogger then) because they are so fascinating. When I was a kid (UK) my mum used to bore us with Neighbours on the TV. There was always a strangely beautiful bird song in the background. I was pretty surprised to find out that was a magpie when I arrived in Sydney. 🙂

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    • Thanks David, A feature of Australian film and TV is the sound of our unique birds in the background, especially in country locations. This was a deliberate feature in the early years as it showcased the true Australian image. The four most commonly heard birds in film background are Magpie, Currawong, Kookaburra and more commonly in movies now and surprising to many, the Masked Lapwing. My wife and I laugh when we hear the Masked Lapwing, and wonder why they feature it, though they are very common birds now, more than they use to be.

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  8. Your Willy Wagtail is a cousin of our Maria Cafra. Every morning I see and hear them snapping up insects outside my living room window. I love them and their song.

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    • Happy New Year to you also dear Myra, and thank you for your most welcome proof reading. I managed to make the corrections. It was too late last night, I should have gone to bed as I was so tired, but I wanted to get the post out before the weekend. It is lovely that we share similar birds and enjoy the beaty and wonder of our Lord’s amazing garden. Glad to read that Chelsea is doing well and fighting on in strength, we continue to lift her in prayer and look forward to her not needing the walking stick. Have a peaceful and blessed weekend.

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