8 comments on “Striking it Rich – Birding the Gold Coast, Queensland

  1. So many wonderful captures, Ashley, I certainly love the dazzling Sacred Kingfisher, what a beauty, and the Royal Spoonbill too! Great series of the Striped Honeyeater attending its neat-looking nest. I thought seeing the goose landing on the tree branch was funny, we definitely don’t see any of our geese in trees. 🙂

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    • Thanks Donna, It was an interesting mix of birds found in this one area, but the Magpie Goose was the cream, as it is rare to see them, especially nesting., but true the Kingfisher is stunning in its blue coat.

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    • Yes Lee, the breeding plumage must somehow make them more attractive, like a good hat. In the past we have managed to get some amazing Afro hair-dos from previous Spoonbills in breeding plumage.

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  2. Thanks for the information in this post Ashley. I actually did not know this wetlands exists yet it’s only a short drive away from my house. I’ve added it to my list of places to visit but it may have to wait awhile now as the weather here has gotten hotter and the sun feels burning even in the morning. I don’t know about you, but the few times I’ve seen a grebe, it’s always one on its own among other waterbirds. Is it a solitary bird or are the other grebes hiding? 🙂

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    • Thanks Sue, there are two lakes in the Emerald Lakes reserve, a and b lake across the road from each other , they are very different lakes in habitat to each other. Yes Australasian Grebes are commonly seen alone in dams and creeks, and only come together to breed, So if you see a pair they may be breeding and will display breeding plumage. We have often seen lone Grebes in the most unexpected places, in the middle of dams in quite barren places. We wonder how they ever find each other to breed. Enjoy your weekend, you may need to go in the afternoon or early morning when the sun is not so high in the sky.

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