15 comments on “Summer Birds – Braving the Heat and Humidity

    • Thanks so much Georgina and welcome to my blog. I usually do a weekly post but have been so busy I am running late this week. I love following the blogs of my friends from other parts of the world also, we learn so much from following them, and it prepares you should you should travel to these regions. We enjoyed our visit to Britain in 2015 where my wife and I did some birding while visiting our daughter and touring the isle. Hope you enjoy our Aussie birds and wildlife, and sometimes wildflowers and scenery.

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  1. This wonderful post with so many colorful birds, many of them relatives of our birds, made me reflect on the fact that you were birding in heat and humidity while we hear (including in Florida) are braving the cold to find birds 🙂 I loved the story – and pictures – of the Tawny Frogmouth family!

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    • Thanks Tiny, That was a wonderful weekend for birds. This weekend has not been as fruitful though, since we have not had a chance to get out and about, as we have been busy with important changes in preparation for work in the new year. Yes it is somewhat psychologically refreshing to see the pictures of birds in the snow from some of the bloggers from your side of the world, while ours duck for cover from the sun. Our bird bath has never seen so much activity as it has in the last week with birds coming in family groups and washing and drinking at frequent intervals. I top it up each day. Yes, the Tawny family has become very popular with the locals here in the park, and people are often asking if anyone has seen them, as they often spend several days returning to the same tree. We missed seeing them nest this year, as no one seemed to know where they did it. Have a wonderful week my friend!.

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  2. This is such a beautiful selection of birds in your wonderful photos. Nice way to start the year for sure. I cannot get over the Frogmouth. Funny name and a prehistoric looking oddity. I liked the calling of the Stilts. They sound really dainty and proper. The Sulfur has the same expression as my Moluccan. Must be a cockatoo behavior.

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    • Thanks Donna! Yes the Frogmouth is a most unusual bird in its own right. many mistakenly call it an owl, which it is not. I often am like a tour guide on sight explaining why it is uniquely different. They are like an owl in their feathers and night hunting but not a raptor in build and hunting and nesting ways. The Stilts have always been one of my favorite birds to photograph for reflections. The Sufurs are crazy cheeky birds very noisy and raucous. If you lived near their roosting site you would have little peace morning and evening.

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  3. Wow, what amazing birds to kick off 2017! I’ve decided to delay my trip to Australia until April so I am hoping the weather will still be pleasant, without being too hot. Those Frogmouths are amazing! As is the Eastern Rosella… I can’t imagine seeing such brightly colours birds around.

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    • Thanks Laura, yes the weather should be cooling down by then and pleasant, though we do get the odd very warm day. We will be doing a road trip out west in April but let us know if you come down to Sydney to do any birding. We are blessed with colourful birds, but interesting enough, the birds that make the most beautiful music are not so colourful, but more shades of black and brown. We have some the most amazing song birds. With the parrot species, we have become accustomed to seeing these bright flashes of colour passing by with their noisy chatter, quite brilliant in the sunlight. The Rainbow Lorikeet is so common here, in large numbers, and is often seen hanging and feeding from our native flowers.

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  4. First, I have to giggle when I read you’re in a heat wave, that alone warms my heart & soul here in the U.S. winter. 🙂 What superb captures, Ashley! I love taking a hike with you through your post and seeing all your beautiful birds each time. I always enjoy the bold-colored Lorikeets and Eastern Rosellas but especially love the male Red-browed Finch, sure wish we had them here in the U.S. You and your wife definitely had a great week in birding, even if it was hot and humid, WOW!

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    • Thanks Donna, the Red-browed Finch is always a challenge for me to get good photos of being so small and active. These are some of my best, as he landed right in front of me unawares. Yes, our Lorikeets and Rosellas are very popular with their beautiful colours. Thanks for your lovely comment, and praying you are up and about soon. My wife’s friend is amazed at what we see on each of our outings, and we are just delighted with God’s generosity in sharing his amazing handiwork with us, with his beautiful gifts.:-)

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  5. Love the variety of birds you saw. I’ve always wanted to see a Superb Fairy Wren! And that Eastern Rosella is a new must see on my list. If I could see birds like that when I go out, I’d brave heat and humidity too!

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    • Thanks 1nM, The Superb Fairy-wren is one of Australia’s most popular birds, also for many overseas visiting birders. We have many families of them living in the parks and reserves around our area. When I meet visiting birders from overseas, it is this bird they often ask me where to find, they are easy to find because they remain moving about in the same general area (territorial). The Splendid Fairy-wren male (pictured on my book cover) is even more beautiful but rarer. I think. Our parrots are another beautiful attraction to our country, and interestingly enough many live out in the hot dry regions of our country. Our Rosellas are quite stunning in the sunlight.

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