16 comments on “Birding in a Heatwave – When the ‘Box of Chocolates’ Melts Down

  1. Sorry I had missed this post! It was just after my travels and our son visiting here. I have made the same observation about birds going into hiding when it’s really hot here…and coming out when it is cool, like this past weekend. You got many nice pictures anyway! I loved the “bird” that actually was a bird wannabe 🙂

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    • Thanks Tiny, It really is a busy time of year and likewise I have found it difficult to keep up with it all also, and birding is more on the back burner at present, not sure if I will have work in the new year, I will know hopefully in a few days. We are preparing for a big blended family Christmas gathering, sooo it just gets busier. Yes, the wannabe, was really just that, out of my disappointment of few birds, I was seeing birds in objects to make up the short fall. have a great week my friend:-)

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  2. So interesting how many Cormorant species you have in Australia! The Little Pied Cormorant is adorable! I might be visiting Australia in February… I am preparing myself for very hot days.

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    • Thanks Laura, yes we are blessed with many different races and subspecies of birds which many other countries only have one or a few kinds. This makes birding in Australia all the more interesting. When I first got into birding and we would travel throughout Australia and its islands I would see the same kind of particular birds in each state, but did not realise till later that they were different races, and had variations due to their location. Yes, February can be very hot in most parts of Aus. especially inland, and very humid on the east coast, intermingled with cooling afternoon winds such as north easterlies, southerlies and thunderstorms. The hot westerly winds are the worse, If you are coming to Sydney look us up, we love to spend time with visiting birders, and do so from time to time. I often meet American, Canadian, British and New Zealand birders. In one National Park, where my book is sold, the waitress at the cafe actually informs me when a new group of birders come in so I can greet them. If you go to myBirding InfoTips page and scroll down to the helpful links you will see one called Best 100 Birdwatching Sites in Australia also on the info page a link to Michael Morcombe’s Australian bird app for iphone. These are great helps if birding in Australia. Enjoy your new camera, looks real cool!

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      • Thanks for the info! My partner is Australian and his visa for Canada expires at the beginning of February. So we can’t really control what the weather will be like over there, but I am a bit apprehensive about the heat! His is from Melbourne, so that will be our base, but I’m sure we will head to Sydney and other areas as well. I’ve only ever been to the Sydney airport on a layover, so I am keen to get out and explore some of the country! I’ll keep you posted as to my plans.

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      • Thanks Laura, Melbourne is known more for its cold weather than its hot, so it is cooler down there than Sydney, though they do get hot summer days. Let us know when your coming to Sydney and we can have a coffee or lunch in Royal National Park or some other birding area nearby. Sydney is surrounded in National Parks and birding areas.

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  3. Wonderful photos, Ashley! Seems so odd to read you’re in a heatwave as we in the U.S. mid-Atlantic are getting colder as the weeks fly by for our upcoming winter. Great shots of the Eastern Whipbird, I love the coloring around his eye. By golly, that last photo sure does look like an exotic bird, so neat!

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    • Thanks Donna, yes it is lovely to see the new snow and the autumn leaves of your winter in the posts of my American friends. It must be wonderful to have a white Christmas. Sorry Donna that my posts have the pictures preceding the descriptive text. I have now corrected the photos, I forgot that with the circle photos you have to put the title in a different box for it to show when you put the curser over it. The Eastern Whipbird was the photo above the text where you could hardly see it, it is a very elusive bird, and I included this poor photo to show how the birds were all seeking shelter from the heat. The morphing Variegates Fairy-wren was the one you were referring to with colour around the eye. Sorry for the confusion. Enjoy your time with family, hope your book arrives in time for Christmas.

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  4. Sorry to hear you are having a heatwave. I hope this is not a year of extreme drought. You do have a wonderful selection of Cormorants. Our cormorant looks a little homely in comparison, LOL.

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    • Thanks Donna, thankfully we do get thunderstorms between the heatwaves which cool and moisten things a little, but we are in for a hot summer. Yes, we are blessed with a selection of Cormorants. I especially love their beautiful blue eyes.

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  5. Nice post and photos. We had a complete opposite experience when at Karijini earlier this year; it was soooo cold that not even a single birdsound could be heard – let alone seen. I guess the whole natural world including reptiles and insects has gone into hiding 😀

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    • Thanks iAMsafari, weather and climate do impact on the birds we see, that’s another reason why birding in the early morning and early evening is the ideal for birders to see and hear the most birds.Yes the cold can be just as difficult to bird in, we have found the same.

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  6. Hi AB, you really are blessed with the Variegated Fairywren. The only ones I ever see when I travel are quick to disappear into the scrub across the paddock.

    A bit of a reminder that the heat is coming, and we’ve had such cold days of late it will be a shock to the system.

    And a delightful look the Golden Whistler, most of them have departed from here by now, but we get the wonderfully vocal Rufous in return.

    Good luck.

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    • Thanks David, The Variegated Fairy-wren is quite a brilliant little bird to see when they are fully morphed, and always a prize for us birders as they are not as common as the Superb. We are getting very hot humid days here now, and the bush birds are feeling it. The main concern coming up soon are fires, as that bush dries out. Thanks for sharing, and have a great week!

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