14 comments on “Lyrebird or Liarbird – A Rainforest Treasure

  1. What a magnificent trove of Australian birding! Thanks for the photographs and commentary. God surely gave you a birdwatching experience that was “something special”, illustrating the Ephesians 3:20 version of how God often answers prayer. The fairywren pics are stunning — reminds me of how the fairywrens are careful in their parenting practices: https://leesbird.com/2016/01/04/teach-your-children-the-right-passwords/ . Also, the lyrebird’s dance is marvelous. Yeas ago I tried to learn Norwegian folk dancing — eventually I was politely asked to stand on the sidelines and take pictures. Of course my pictures were nothing like the magnificent photos that you have given in this blogpost.

    Like

    • Thanks so much James for your warm appraising comment. We are always expectant of blessing and encouraged by the gifts our Lord grants us in our birding experience. Thanks for sharing your experience and findings I have also read on Lee’s blog. Yes, the Fairy-wren is remarkable in how it cares for its young. It is the first bird in my recent book release ‘What Birds Teach Us’. We can learn so much about life from them. Jesus himself directed us to ‘Observe and learn from the birds, how they do life’. This has been my prime motivation in birdwatching, not just capturing photos but learning and discerning the lessons and unusual peculiar and unique characteristics of each of our birds, and applying these to our life. I always get excited when I hear a Lyrebird in the forest, I have become better at discerning their mimicry from the true sounds of other birds. My captures of the male dancing have been real highlight gifts for me. Thanks again for your welcome comment

      Like

  2. First, I have to comment on your past several posts that I just viewed and missed your comment window. WOW! Ashley, there were so many quality captures in those posts of so many birds. And so many that I’ve never heard of or seen. What a delight! I am truly amazed and thankful how God beautifies each bird, no matter the color. Congrats on the lifers you captured in those posts also!

    This post, I love your captures of the male Variegated Fairy-wren, with that little splash of turquoise on his face, so pretty! And loved the photos and videos of the mating dance of the mature male Lyrebird. Your country really is a birder’s paradise! 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks so much Donna, it is always a great pleasure to have you along on our birding expeditions, and your kind comments are appreciated. Yes the amazing variety of birds we discover just glorifies the wisdom and beauty of God in His intelligent design. God is the best artist, and His birds are just one small aspect. The footage of the male Lyrebird dancing was a real gift capture. I like that my posts are not just photos of birds but share the unusual and peculiar characteristics of the birds like in my book. I learn so much about life from them. Continue to enjoy your exploration of your beautiful land until next time. All the best:-)

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Amazing videos and pictures! The Lyre bird’s tail plumage is truly impressive and the mating dance as well. I smiled at the young male practicing his mating dance, he has ways to go in perfecting it 🙂 The Fairy-wren was also very beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Tiny, sighting and hearing the lyrebird in the forest is always a highlight of any walk. We are so blessed that they have survived so far decimation by ferule cats and introduced predators. The Fairy-wren was so stunning in the morning sun, I was quite taken by his beauty even as he was still in morph mode:-)

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Really great footage of the bristlebird, just going about its usual business seemingly not aware of your presence. You’re very fortunate to have seen these endangered birds. And I love the video of the pied currawong, he obviously knows what a Tim Tam is! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Sue, it was a great blessing to see the Bristlebird and get the footage i did. It was shot from a distance, but they seem to be concentrating on looking for food rather than watching for intruders. However, they quickly went into the bush when they saw me. The Currawong was a real classic, he knew what he wanted and had no hesitation directly accessing it.

      Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.