8 comments on “Exploring Oatley Park Reserve Part 2

  1. Another beautiful post from Oatley Park! I really like your pictures of the bird of the week, the Rose Robin. And the bright colors of the male Fairy-wren – beautiful blue! I only caught a couple of birds while at my childhood home in Finland 🙂

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    • Thanks Tiny, great to have you back, thanks for your comments, it must we wonderful to walk in your homeland forests, I know how different and enjoyable it was to walk in the Scottish forests last year, as we do not have deciduous trees here, and the leaves are not light coloured. We do have a beautiful variety of birds, though many are endangered and threatened due to habitat destruction, as you know. It is great to discover a non familiar bird in a park that I walk in frequently. have a great weekend my friend:-)

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  2. How beautiful is that male rose robin! And what a magnificent capture of one in mid flight! I could listen to those magpies all day long, I love hearing them at our place when I’m getting ready for work in the morning, it really brightens my day when I hear them.

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    • Thanks Sue, The rose robin is always a delight to behold, but likes being high up and elusive, though his bright breast makes him quite spotable. Yes sometimes you just get that special shot which you usually don’t realise till your reviewing your takes for the day at home. I also love hearing the long warble sessions of the maggies communicating to each other through the day. The most common sounds I hear throughout the day are the Grey Butcherbird (my little friend), the Maggies, the Currawong, the Rainbows and the Sulphurs, and of course the Noisy Minors. If I hear the call of the Yellow-tails I am out the door with my camera in seconds. Yes I believe I like yourself have a better day having heard the birds in morning chorus, for me it is the Grey Butcherbird, as he moves around our house always singing his excited little song. I always feel a sense of joy when I hear him, and he is usually the first bird I hear in the morning.

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  3. Thanks David, yes the Rose Robin unlike the Eastern Yellow is only here in winter and he will probably disappear more inland to the ranges possibly in summer. months. The wonderful thing about this little bird is that you can spot it easily in a tree, no matter how small it is. The biggest problem then is to actually photograph it focusing on it and not the branch it is on:-)

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  4. Most interested in the story of the Lone Pine Seed. Makes a nice touched of connectedness.

    and of course the Rose Robin, we have the pleasure of a male that comes in for the winter. And he seems to settle on his own in the one small roadside bushland area and is usually quite easy to find and to photograph. But, then the season changes, and he’s gone.

    You shots show how wonderfully rich that male colour is.
    Great story

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