16 comments on “Discovering Bird Corridors – Wait and the Birds Will Come to You

  1. I recently looked at the bird corridors here in Florida and was not very surprised to find that one goes very close to our area! That’s why we have so many birds stopping by either once or twice each year 🙂 Your pictures are beautiful, and I am amazed how many different variations there are of Kingfishers! This one is especially beautiful. Thank you for sharing and have a wonderful weekend, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • How wonderful Tiny to have a corridor so close. If I ever went to the USA, I think Florida would be one of the places I would want to visit. Yes we are blessed with several kinds of Kingfishers, but I was doubly blessed to see two kinds together in the same place. Thanks for your warm comments Tiny my kindred hearted friend. Have a great weekend:-)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Such beautiful captures, and so many! Indeed a thrilling visit along a bird corridor. So happy for you to see another lifer, and your message of hope and tying it in with your post was beautiful. Great post, Ashley! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Donna, it is true we need more farmer cooperation. Thankfully some farmers are making their properties nature reserves and permitting conservation groups to replant trees on them. The largest public support for this in Australia is for the saving of the critically endangered Regent Honeyeater.

      Like

    • Thanks Kathy, yes the Sacred Kingfisher at such close range was an amazing blessing, as they seldom let you get so close, and catch the vibrancy of their colour.

      Like

    • Thanks so much Myra. We have been upholding Chelsea and yourself in prayer every day. I would love to send her one of my books to encourage her. If you email your address I will post you one as a gift, its alright with me if you do not desire to do so:-)

      Like

  3. Fantastic photos of the Sacred Kingfisher, how amazing to have it catch and eat a worm in front of you! I also loved the recording of the Eastern Whipbird, it brought back many wonderful memories for me as I have not heard one since I moved to Queensland. Very interesting reading, thanks for sharing. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Sue, Yes you do miss particular bird sounds when you move to different areas. I miss the sound of the Pied Butcherbird, it is so beautiful, I grew up with its song, now I have the Grey Burchrbird visit every day, but it is not the same. The Whipbird has been a long and difficult journey for me, it has only been in recent years that I have learned how to catch it in a photo successfully. Thanks for your welcome comment Sue, enjoy your week:-)

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Beaut to see and agree with your wait and they will come, and the importance of bird corricords. More important right now, as the seasonal winter migrants begin to arrive.
    We don’t see Rufous Fantials often, they just drift though and stay a few days. But today we came acorss one, and eventaully managed a few good photos. A bit like climbing Everest for me, but no flag at the top as we didn’t manage a single good tail display. Oh well.

    And such a delight to have a winters day brightented up by a Golden Whistler. Great shots out in the open.

    Good luck

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks David, it was a beautiful mix of birds, for staying in one place, and the whistlers really brought the air of excitement with their ceaseless noisy but melodious calls. Yes, it has always been a challenge for me also to get the fanning of the Rufous tail, I tried recently for over an hour in one of my favourite reserves and they were just too fast for me:-)

      Like

Comments are closed.