14 comments on “Sunset on our Summer Migrants – North to Alaska!

  1. Awesome captures, great flight and reflection shots! It always puts a sadness in my heart to see favorites leave for migration, wondering if our ‘friends’ will return back in six months or so. The miles they travel and hardships they endure in migration are surreal. Great ending poster and closing, Ashley. 🙂

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  2. What a beautiful post. I find it quite amazing to think about the migratory habits of birds – the vast distances they have to travel and how they know where to go. It’s rather comforting really to see these aspects of nature. They teach us many lessons. Since getting my new camera I’ve become more interested in water birds as I’m able to see their features more. Your wonderful blog pictures and information are such a great resource and encouragement to others. Thank you! 🙂

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    • Thank you so much Jane for your most encouraging comments. Yes, I learn so much from birds, as I have highlighted in my book I released last year. It is great that your new camera gives you good captures. Some waterbirds are very shy, and you do need a good zoom to catch them before they see you and fly off. I am thrilled that I have been asked to do presentations in schools, it so encouraging to see young people getting into appreciation of birds and learning from them.Have a great weekend:-)

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    • Thanks Kathy, I guess my favourite season for birding is Spring to Summer. Early Summer is the best for all round birding because the migrant waders and passerines have returned from up north and the honeyeaters are active because the eucalypt blossom is flowering. Many birds are nesting and water babies in particular are out and about. It is a very active and exciting time for birding here as we have so many different birds.

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  3. The migration has always been a miracle to me…the endurance of these small guys is amazing! I hope many will return to you next summer! Loved your catch of the Osprey with his catch 🙂

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    • Thanks Tiny, it is sad to see my little friends go, as I get so excited when I see them on the mudflats. I guess the fact that they are seasonal visitors makes them all the more special. Yes, that Osprey was a special gift. I did not have my camera ready fast enough when he flew over the first time, and I thought I had lost the opportunity, but then for some unknown reason it circled near the edge of the reef, causing every bird on the reef to scurry, and then flew back right past me, and I was ready by then:-) Enjoy resting in the warmth of your spring my friend, I think autumn has finally arrived today, late as it is.

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      • One thing I don’t quite get. Why were the birds scurrying away? Did they think Ospreys had other birds on their menu? Here not one little bird is afraid of them – somehow they know they are not in danger. Some even sat at the edge of the nest when Mama was alone eating in the nest before the nesting season.

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      • That is an interesting observation Tiny, I guess it may be different over here. As the sight of any raptor in the sky normally sends birds both shore and passerine into a noisy flurry of alarm. That is often how I know to look for a raptor in the sky when I hear birds carrying on being noisy and flying about, especially id they have young. They may not discern that the Osprey is a fish eater, as most other large raptors here eat birds. It may have frightened them, unexpectedly, as they normally would not see a raptor on the reef, it normally flies in over the beach.

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    • Thanks Lee, I just added a little bit more near the end that I forgot to add about God’s provision, I referred to earlier in the post. Yes, it is sad that we are loosing so many migrant birds each year. Birdlife International is actively addressing this problem.

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